Townsend in the Smokies Spring Festival and Old Timers Day

 
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April 28
thru
May 6
2006

Drowsing
Townsend in the Smokies Spring Festival & Old Timers Day

April 28 May 6, 2006

April 28
thru
May 6
2006


 
Dowsing is as strictly defined the claimed ability to discover underground sources of water or metals by means of a "dowsing rod." Another term used is "divining." However, this terminology and its scope have been expanded and is now used with a far greater range of meanings. Dowsing now includes the claimed ability to discover almost anything, from water and minerals to missing children and archaeological sites. Each dowser will have his or her specialty. The device any dowser will use ranges from the traditional forked stick to just the bare hand. Pendulums, bent wires, wands of various sorts, and swiveled rods and housings are commonly encountered. In every case, the device used is a system in a state of unstable equilibrium, something that cannot easily be kept in a steady condition, and which is subject to very slight tremors, twitches, or changes of inclination. There are an astonishing variety of metal springs, coils, wires, balls, threads and bobbing elastic devices, all trembling and vibrating freely, used as dowsing machinery.

In the old times, wells were dug by hand with a pick and shovel. With the huge amount of effort that was involved in digging even a shallow well which could last weeks and sometimes dragging into months for deeper wells with lots of rock, they certainly wanted to have some kind of assurance their efforts would be successful. Because of this, dowsing found wide acceptance during the colonization of the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries. We think you'll find this demonstration of the ways of the Old Timers interesting to say the least .

 

 
Some people (both men and women) were known for having this skill. They were paid for this work. A female dowser, related that "I spent one whole day water witching, and when I got home I was tired than I've ever been in my life. I'd had all the magic drained out of me."
 
  Dowsing, water divining or water-witching, is an ancient skill, not fully understood by orthodox science, in which gifted individuals are able to locate underground water (or indeed any object, pipe, tunnel, cable, mineral vein, etc.) by means of a neurophysical response when passing over the target object. The muscular spasm induced in the process is usually, but not always, amplified by the use of a dowsing instrument or rod. These come in many forms; most commonly, the forked hazel twig, the modern equivalent (two knitting needles with their points driven into a cork), the pendulum (a weight on the end of a string), L-rods (fashioned from two wire coat hangers) and so on. Most good dowsers search for 'tangible targets'. These would be as described above and the efficiency of the dowser can be tested by digging to verify that the search has been successful. The ability to find water and minerals, the outline of buried foundations and pits is well documented and accepted, if not fully understood.
 
More recently people are claiming to be able to locate 'intangible targets' or to be able to dowse from a map. Growing interest in earth mysteries in the 1970s led to the development of the theory that ancient sacred sites were located to mark or control the flow of a subtle 'earth energy' or 'life force' which they believe was an important part of a cosmic/sacred engineering system in the ancient past (the Golden Age). This belief, in part came from the writings of Guy Underwood in the 1950s (not published until the late 1960s) and was developed by other dowsers, particularly Tom Graves, who theorized about ancient standing stones and 'earth acupuncture' and fostered the belief in 'energy dowsing'. Attempts to measure such energies have been unsuccessful.
 

Event held at the Townsend Visitors Center
7906 E. Lamar Alexander Parkway / Highway 321 Townsend TN
Contact the Townsend Visitors Center for more information. 800-525-6834 or 865-448-6134